My Book Haul

A Place for My Books and Thoughts

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October 20, 2014 in Reading

This week, I am going to be finishing The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith/J.K. Rowling. It is my goal to finish it by Wednesday so I can finally turn it in. It’s been overdue but I don’t want to wait on the list any longer than I already have, so I’m keeping it an extra two days so I can finish it!

Next, I will be continuing reading Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand, and The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan. Both of these are about WWII, but both deal with it differently. Both are nonfiction, with Kiernan’s book being about a group of women who worked in manufacturing secret cities that worked solely on creating the atomic bomb, and Hillenbrand’s book being about Louis Zamperini, a young man who was a runner in the Berlin Olympics before WWII and his story of becoming an airman when the US became involved in the war. They both have been taking me longer than expected because they both seem dense in facts that need to be absorbed rather than just glanced over. 

Those are the three books I will be continuing reading this week, but hopefully I’ll finish all three! 

What are you guys reading this week?

Filed under The Silkworm Robert Galbraith JK Rowling J.K. Rowling Unbroken Laura Hillenbrand The Girls of Atomic City Denise Kiernan WWII WWII nonfiction nonfiction thriller detective thriller crime atomic bomb Louis Zamperini

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The Rules of Attraction by Bret Easton Ellis
Book Review
Like many of Bret Easton Ellis’ work, this book involves a lot of sex, drugs, music references, affluent college kids, and death. 
The Rules of Attraction begins midsentence, in the middle of a story about the night a girl lost her virginity, which is a great introduction to Ellis’s writing style of long comma filled, converstation-like sentences. The novel follows a group of college students as they go through their fall semester at a liberal arts college in New England in the 1980s, which involves skipping classes, sleeping with one another, getting drunk and high at all times of the day. The story is also told through various perspectives of the characters, most of which are of the same scene. 
We have three main characters, with contribution from other side characters. Sean is a drug-loving, promiscuous, potentially bisexual, twenty-one-year-old from a rich family; Lauren is a promiscuous artist who is passing her time with various boys while pining for a boyfriend who left to Europe; and Paul is bisexual, having dated Lauren before the book takes places and currently hooking up with Sean. 
A lot of the events that take place in the book are open to the reader’s interpretation of the text and also which character the reader likes best. Whoever one places their trust in effectively decides which chain of events one believes actually happened. I love how Ellis is able to show how conversations and events tend to change depending on who one talks to in real life, especially with the drug and alcohol fueled lives of college students. 
Overall, I thought that the book was pretentious and exaggerated college life dramatically, I can’t say that this isn’t the usual style of Ellis (which I love btw). The story was very compelling and seeing many damaged, drug using young people deal (or not) with their emotions and problems was very interesting. Also, because this was told from the point of various people and mainly around big events, there wasn’t a lot of internal overthinking that was found in Ellis’ Less Than Zero.
I would recommend this to anyone who is currently attending college or attended college because it is very reminiscent of the sometimes exaggerated ideas of college that we are all engrained with.
Rating: 4/5

The Rules of Attraction by Bret Easton Ellis

Book Review

Like many of Bret Easton Ellis’ work, this book involves a lot of sex, drugs, music references, affluent college kids, and death. 

The Rules of Attraction begins midsentence, in the middle of a story about the night a girl lost her virginity, which is a great introduction to Ellis’s writing style of long comma filled, converstation-like sentences. The novel follows a group of college students as they go through their fall semester at a liberal arts college in New England in the 1980s, which involves skipping classes, sleeping with one another, getting drunk and high at all times of the day. The story is also told through various perspectives of the characters, most of which are of the same scene. 

We have three main characters, with contribution from other side characters. Sean is a drug-loving, promiscuous, potentially bisexual, twenty-one-year-old from a rich family; Lauren is a promiscuous artist who is passing her time with various boys while pining for a boyfriend who left to Europe; and Paul is bisexual, having dated Lauren before the book takes places and currently hooking up with Sean. 

A lot of the events that take place in the book are open to the reader’s interpretation of the text and also which character the reader likes best. Whoever one places their trust in effectively decides which chain of events one believes actually happened. I love how Ellis is able to show how conversations and events tend to change depending on who one talks to in real life, especially with the drug and alcohol fueled lives of college students. 

Overall, I thought that the book was pretentious and exaggerated college life dramatically, I can’t say that this isn’t the usual style of Ellis (which I love btw). The story was very compelling and seeing many damaged, drug using young people deal (or not) with their emotions and problems was very interesting. Also, because this was told from the point of various people and mainly around big events, there wasn’t a lot of internal overthinking that was found in Ellis’ Less Than Zero.

I would recommend this to anyone who is currently attending college or attended college because it is very reminiscent of the sometimes exaggerated ideas of college that we are all engrained with.

Rating: 4/5

(Source: josemoran28, via josemoran)

Filed under Bret Easton Ellis The Rules of Attraction books quotes lit literature book review book reviews reviews